MISCELLANY II, MISCELLANY HARDER (answers)

And again we see Susan McL at the top of the leaderboard.  She was apparently the most miscellaneous person out there, and got a disjointed 7/10.  Way to be random and unconnected, Sue!  🙂

1) What J.M. Barrie play, written before ‘Peter Pan’, leant it’s name to a popular assortment of chocolates, sold in a purple tin?

QUALITY STREET

2) If you were to see an “O.V.N.I.” in France, Spain, Portugal or Italy, what might you call it in English?

A U.F.O.

3) “K numbers”, short for “Köchel numbers”, are used to catalogue the works of which composer?

MOZART (Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart)

4) In the twelfth century work “History Of The Kings Of Britain” by Geoffrey of Monmouth, King Arthur’s sword is called “Caliburn” instead of the name more commonly used today, “Excalibur”. In the same work, what was Arthur’s spear called?

RON

5) Architect Oscar Niemeyer was commissioned to design all of the civic buildings in what national capital, with most work completed in time for a 1960 opening ceremony?

BRASÍLIA, BRAZIL

6) What, according to a 1946 speech given in Fulton, Missourri, stretched “from Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic”?

AN IRON CURTAIN (Winston Churchill was in the small town accepting an honorary degree from Westminster College)

7) In Lewis Carrol’s “Alice In Wonderland” what were used as mallets for the croquet match?

FLAMINGOS

8) In Shakespeare’s “Henry V”, the Dauphin of France sends King Henry a ‘gift’, meant as an insult and a mockery of Henry’s claim to the French throne. What gift?

A CHEST FULL OF TENNIS BALLS

9) Whose picture is on the label of every bottle of Samuel Adams Boston Lager?

PAUL REVERE (The story is that Adams was too ugly, so young and handsome Revere was chosen instead. The story is unverified)

10) Green weakens him, red tranforms him, gold strips him of powers and red-gold gives him amnesia. Who and what are we talking about?

SUPERMAN and DIFFERENT FORMS OF KRYPTONITE

The first time I ever saw “Henry V” was the Ken Brannagh film in 1989.  When the ‘Tennis Balls’ bit came up, it really bothered me.  I was sure it was anachronistic, and must be some odd joke Brannagh was making that I didn’t get.  But it was actually true to the script.  Tennis goes back that far and farther, according to wiki, with its origins lying somewhere in 12th century France.  Historians seem to disagree on whether the Dauphin of France really did send such a gift.  The only accounts of it are in poems and ballads.

The balls were probably not Dunlop though.  That’s my guess.

Thanks,

QM Bill

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