POP QUIZ: THAT OLD FAMILIAR TUNE (answers)

Tough one, this week. So an especially big congratulations needs to go to Tim B, who took top honours. Way to go, Tim!

Given the original song and artist, name the subsequent artist and song which were the subject of a copyright dispute (NOTE: not all of these disputes became lawsuits, and some of the cases that did were unsuccessful).

1) “I Want A New Drug” by Huey Lewis & The News
2) “Kookaburra” by Marion Sinclair
3) “He’s So Fine” by The Chiffons
4) “Run Through The Jungle” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
5) “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty
6) “Got To Give It Up” by Marvin Gaye
7) “The Air That I Breathe” by The Hollies
8) “Taurus” by Spirit
9) “The Last Time” by The Rolling Stones
10) “Under Pressure” by Queen & David Bowie

1) “GHOSTBUSTERS” by RAY PARKER JR
2) “DOWN UNDER” by MEN AT WORK
3) “MY SWEET LORD” by GEORGE HARRISON
4) “THE OLD MAN DOWN THE ROAD” by JOHN FOGERTY
5) “STAY WITH ME” by SAM SMITH
6) “BLURRED LINES” by ROBIN THICKE
7) “CREEP” by RADIOHEAD
8) “STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN” by LED ZEPPELIN
9) “BITTERSWEET SYMPHONY” by THE VERVE
10) “ICE ICE BABY” by VANILLA ICE

Huey Lewis and Ray Parker Jr settled out of court, and the details were sealed by a confidentiality agreement. When Lewis commented on the settlement years later, Parker sued him for breach of contract. So, they’ve each paid each other now.

Yes, you read number four correctly. John Fogerty was sued by his old record label for sounding too much like himself. Full copyright for the old CCR track, along with the rest of the catalogue, had been given to Fantasy Records as part of an agreement Fogerty signed years before, releasing him from having to work with the label anymore. Fortunately for sane and reasonable people everywhere, Fogerty won the case, and was even awarded legal fees in a precedent-setting ruling.

The Verve were pretty much destroyed by the Rolling Stones lawsuit. Their track did more than just sound like the earlier song, it actually used a sampled segment of an orchestral version. And the bitterest part of The Bittersweet Symphony was that they had actually obtained permission to use the sample in the first place. But the Stones manager (rock’n’roll pitbull Alan Klein) claimed they sampled too large a piece, which invalidated the agreement. By the end of the suit, Verve had lost all royalties and artistic control of pretty much their only hit. The Stones made millions, for a song they wrote forty years earlier, and a sample on which they didn’t play.

Thanks,
QM Bill

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